1. Gender Norms, Labour Supply and Poverty Reduction in Comparative Context (January 2014-December 2016)

Funded By: Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)

The project Gender Norms, Labour Supply and Poverty Reduction in Comparative Context: Evidence from Rural India and Bangladesh is an International Research study looking at how poverty programs have affected people’s lives in rural India and rural Bangladesh. The main focus is on women, work and attitudes. The study is led by the University of Manchester, UK, in cooperation with (XXX) and BRAC Institute of Governance and Development, BRAC University, Dhaka. Funding for Study comes from the Economic and Social Research Council and Department for International Development, UK.

Research Team: Simeen Mahmud, Sohela Nazneen, Maheen Sultan, Saima Huq Bidisha, Sadia Mustafa, Kabita Chowdhury, Saiful Islam, Sahida Khondaker, Bayazid Hasan

For further information, please contact: Kabita Chowdhury


2. Choice, constraints and the gender dynamics of labour markets in Bangladesh (April 2014 – March 2017)

Funded By: Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) 

The research will address the following overarching question under the Joint Fund for Poverty Alleviation Research (2012-13): what approaches are most effective in enabling the poorest to exit and stay out of poverty and under what conditions can such approaches be replicated elsewhere and at what scale? It will also have a strong focus on two cross-cutting issues: the intersection between class, gender and spatial inequality in explaining labour market segmentation; and methodological innovation through the iterative combination of a purposively designed panel data set with qualitative data so as to maximize the value-added by each method.

The overall aim of the project is to carry out detailed empirical research into the gender dynamics of the labour market in Bangladesh as an example of such a context. South Asia generally reports some of the lowest female labour force participation rates in the world, despite positive though varying rates of economic growth in recent decades. It is also a region where many of the human dimensions of poverty, particularly their gender dimensions, are much lower than warranted by prevailing growth rates (Mehrotra, 2006). Bangladesh represents a promising context in which to explore these puzzling outcomes because it combines a modest but steady rate of growth, remarkable progress on certain aspects of gender equality but a slow pace of change on women’s participation in paid work. While our research will be confined to Bangladesh, our attention to variations in the wider context, including variations in local policy regimes, suggests our findings will provide policy lessons relevant elsewhere in South Asia. The study is led by the London School of Economics (LSE)

Research Team: Simeen Mahmud, Lopita Huq, Sadia Mustafa, Kabita Chowdhury, Saiful Islam, Sanjida Parvin, Sufia Khatun

For further information, please contact: Kabita Chowdhury


3. States delivering for poor people: Improving outcomes through strong evidence (April 2015-October 2016)

Funded By: Effective States and Inclusive Development Research Centre (ESID)

This project will work under the title “States delivering for poor people: Improving outcomes through strong evidence” funded by Department for International Development (DFID) in United Kingdom. The investigation will include, what kind of policy is susceptible to play a positive role  for sustainable development  in terms of Education and Gender Equity in developing countries Many universities from Ghana, Uganda, Bangladesh, India, South Africa and Malayi are involved with ISID in this research project .

In the context of Bangladesh, “ States delivering for poor people: Improving outcomes through strong evidence” research project will separately conduct two comparative research of these two fields named Gender and Education. Bangladesh has made significant strides in terms of achieving gender equity and Universal primary education implementation. The main objective of this research is to show this success. The study titled “ Gender and political settlement : A comparative analysis of gendered inclusion and policy influence in developing countries” will conduct to understand the status of Women participation in socio-economic development of Bangladesh. In this research, Gender equity in education and Violence against women-related reformation and policy formulation will be reviewed. In  another research, titled “Improving the quality of social provisioning within competitive clientelist contexts: A comparison of Bangladesh and Ghana” a comparative study will conduct to understand the quality of primary education in the context of Bangladesh and Ghana. Bangladesh for its achievement in primary education, is a bright example for any country of the world . This research will play a significant role  to promote this achievement at the international level. 

Research Team: Simeen Mahmud, Sohela Nazneen, Mirza Hasan, Mugadha Mim Mazhab, Kabita Chowdhury, Nuzhat Sharmeen, Towhid Iqram Mahmood, Ahmed Asif Enam

For further information, please contact: Kabita Chowdhury

    
4. Gender Equality diagnostics of Selected Sectors (September 2015- August 2016)

Funded by: Asian Development Bank (ADB)

The Asian Development Bank (ADB) is scheduled to develop the next Bangladesh Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) in 2015. As indicated in the ADB Operations Manual - Operations Procedures Section A2/OP (footnote 3), knowledge products required to be available at the time of CPS preparation will include a gender analysis containing an assessment of the challenges to inclusive growth. The (proposed) BAN: Gender Equality Diagnostic of Selected Sectors [herewith, Gender Equality Diagnostic (GED)] –will be aligned with the 7th Five-Year Plan– and inform the formulation of the CPS gender strategy while –at the same time– provide the Government of Bangladesh (GOB) with a tool and platform to further advance progress in mainstreaming gender in sector policies, strategies and programs, in line with the commitments set out in the National Women Development Policy (2011). In this context, the ADB Team met with Government and sector/line agencies which all confirmed the limited interest in the update of a traditional Country Gender Assessment (CGA) [Country Gender Assessment: Bangladesh. ADB. 2010] and recommended that a more in-depth sector-specific gender analysis be carried out for specific sectors for practical use in the design and implementation of sector-specific initiatives1. 

The GED will include ADB priority sectors identified in the ADB Bangladesh’s Country Partnership and include:

a) Transport [esp. mobility and gender-related aspects of infrastructure development (national rural and urban roads, railways and ports) and transport services];

b) Energy (incl. rural electrification and renewable energy);

c) Urban Development [incl. governance, water supply and sanitation, and primary and environmental health (including waste management)];

d) Education (with emphasis on vocational education, skills development and tertiary education).

In the preparation of the GED, particular attention will be given to preparatory work carried out by the GOB for the preparation of the 7th Five-Year Plan, the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) Post 2015 Development Agenda; Beijing + 20 Review; the 8th Periodic Report submitted by GOB to the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), and other relevant documents. For each of the identified sectors, the GED will provide an analysis and overview on the current achievements and gaps in incorporating gender-responsive budgeting and programming.

Purpose of the Assignment: The GED will help guide ADB operations over the next 5 years. It will support the gender and development (GAD) objectives of the GOB and the ADB. It will assess the gender situation in the selected sectors and inform the gender strategy section of the ADB Country Partnership Strategy (CPS).

Research Team: Maheen Sultan, Asma Huq, Salma Awal Shafi, Zia Us Sabur, Sahida Khondaker, Sadia Mustafa, Mahan Ul Haq

For further information, please contact: Sahida Khondaker

5. Evidence Based Foundation of Women’s Economic Empowerment (December 2015 - June 2016)

Funded By: United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Bangladesh and the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment (UN Women) Bangladesh plan to develop and implement a joint five-year programme on women’s economic empowerment. In order to develop a relevant, catalytic, and transformative programme, the programme’s design and development will be based on a foundation of evidence and analysis that will help establish programme objectives, design and expected impact.

UNDP identified four research areas which are as follows:
1. Macroeconomic analysis: A gender-based macroeconomic analysis and a high-level demographic summary of women in Bangladesh;
2. Social institutions analysis: Analysis of the influence of social institutions on women’s economic opportunities and constraints;
3. Opportunities analysis (A) – Market: Deep dive on unmet labor supply in the economy with high-potential opportunities for women; and
4. Opportunities analysis (B) – Policy: Deep dive on the current space for policy action, identifying opportunities to promote policy that would positively influence women’s economic empowerment.

The purpose the study is
  • to prepare a detailed demographic summary of the women of Bangladesh
  • to assess key macroeconomic trends and policies in terms of gender differences in economic behavior and outputs
  •  to establish a sound understanding of macroeconomic policies that exist and are impacting (both positively and negatively) on women's economic empowerment opportunities
  •  to identity the key institutions that impact women’s participation in, contribution to and benefit from economic activities in Bangladesh
  •  to assess the existing policies and identify areas for policy intervention to increase women’s access to economic opportunities including job markets and jobs.

Research Team: Simeen Mahmud, Maheen Sultan, Kaniz Siddique, Ferdousi Sultana Begum, Sahida Khondaker, Nuzhat Sharmeen, Sadia Mustafa, Ahmed Asif Enam, Towhid Iqram mahmood, Mushfiqa Khanum

For further information, please contact: Sahida Khondaker

 

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Established in 2012, the Centre for Gender and Social Transformation (CGST), conducts research, teaching and policy advocacy in the area of gender and social change, contributing a strong southern voice to the theory and practice of gender and development. It is a multidisciplinary center involving academics, practitioners and activists. The Center evolved organically based on research and advocacy conducted by the CGST researchers funded under two large multi-country research program consortia: The Citizenship Development Research Center (http://www.drc-citizenship.org/), and the Pathways of Women’s Empowerment Research Program Consortium (http://www.pathwaysofempowerment.org). The Center primarily works on the following three thematic areas: a) labor markets and livelihoods; b) political participation and citizenship; c) the influence of media and religion on construction of gendered cultural norms.  It has strong research links and partnerships with the Institute of Development Studies (IDS), UK; The Gender Center, London School of Economics (LSE); University of Manchester, UK; The Population Council; International Center for Research on Women (ICRW). It has been commission research, review and policy work by the Ministry of Women’s and Children’s Affairs (MOWCA); ILO (Geneva); UNWomen Bangladesh; the World Bank, Dhaka Office; UNDP, Dhaka Office; ActionAid Bangladesh; brac and other development agencies and think tanks.

Contact: Maheen Sultan, Deputy Co-ordinator, Centre for Gender and Social Transformation, and Visiting Fellow, BIGD

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1. Exploring unpaid work of Women: Barriers Implications and Opportunities (October 2014- April 2015)

Funded By: Oxfam Bangladesh

Oxfam Bangladesh and Centre for Gender and Social Transformation (CGST) of BRAC Institute of Governance and Development (BIGD) carried out a study “Exploring Unpaid work of Women: Barriers Implications and Opportunities”-as part of the global efforts Oxfam is making to understand the status of unpaid care work, its gender dimensions and its impacts over women’s life cycle.

The study was carried out in the period between October 2014 and February 2015 with field work in four districts: Faridpur, Jamalpur, Gainbandha and Nilphamari. The research was done with rural women and men involved in the Oxfam support programme: “Resilience through Economic Empowerment, Climate Adaptation, Leadership and Learning” (REE-CALL) in the disaster prone Northern Char, Haor, and Southern Coastal communities of Bangladesh where Women’s Economic Leadership (WEL) and Gendered Enterprise and Market Programme (GEM), focusing on developing of the livelihood of small holder dairy farmers, was also present.

Research Team: Maheen Sultan, Sahida Khondaker, Bayazid Hasan, Sanjida Hossain, Mistee Rani Shaha, Rafiquzzaman, Mahan Ul Haq, Mahbub
 
Output: Research Report
 
For further information, please contact: Sahida Khondaker

2. Qualitative base-line case study for the Better Work Bangladesh (March 2015 - October 2015)

Funded by: International Labor Organization (ILO)

This project was in response to the call by Better Work Global Programme for conducting a baseline qualitative study on the Bangladesh Ready-Made Garment sector. Better Work Bangladesh (BWB) was launched in October 2013 and will provide factory-level services, including assessments of compliance with national labour law and international standards, and advisory and training services to help factories make improvements. BWB’s core advisory services and training will place a strong focus on industrial relations, specifically to contribute to improved worker/management dialogue, to ensure that changes and change mechanisms are sustainable in the long term. In Bangladesh the Better Work Bangladesh (BWB) factory-level operations are expected to begin during the second half of 2014, and is initially envisioned as a three-year programme.

The key question was explored in the global impact assessment will be whether BWB operations and services, built upon improved industrial relations and social dialogue and targeting improvements in working conditions (including occupational safety and health) lead to effective and sustainable changes in working conditions, workers’ wellbeing, and performances of firms, as well as to measurable improvements in broader social and human development indicators, with a particular attention to gender equality aspects.

The broad objective of this qualitative baseline study is to provide a more accurate assessment of the scenario with respect to a broad range of indicators of worker well being and industrial relations within firms in the Ready-Made Garment sector in Bangladesh prior to the implementation of the BWB interventions at the factory level, which can be used to contribute to evaluating the impact of the programme.

Research Team: Simeen Mahmud, Lopita Huq, Kabita Chowdhury, Ahmed Asif Enam, Towhid Iqram, Sanjida Parvin, Sufia Khatun
Output: Research Report

For further information, please contact: Kabita Chowdhury

 

3. A Study on Women’s Representation in Union Parishad (April 2015- February 2016)

Funded By: Local Governance Programme SHARIQUE-III

Recent study findings indicate a declining participation of women in local level elections in both reserved and general seats. These studies largely refer to gender discriminatory practices in the way Union Parishads operate and the gender biased culture at the local level as reasons behind women’s declining participation in politics. That implicates the need for a nuanced analysis of women’s experience in local government and their ability to exercise political agency to negotiate local level politics and various barriers. Despite the wealth of literature on the impact of quotas and direct elections on women’s representation at the local level and various program evaluation studies, there is a paucity of nuanced and context -grounded scholarship on what are the different pathways through which women gain access to political power at the local level and what enhances women’s political agency. This means that while there is an understanding of the barriers women face and the limitations of how they are able to exercise leadership, less is known about how, when and in which areas they do exercise agency and can influence structures, processes and people to bring about change or make decisions in their favour.

The study aims to address the above mentioned gap and focuses on how, where and when women receive support for their accession and practice of political leadership at the local level; how women engage with opposition in such a process; the kinds of coalitions women representatives form as they try to promote their political agenda once they are in power and the strategies follow and negotiations they make to further their objectives; what is women’s experience in negotiating local bureaucracy and political power structures; how people perceive women’s leadership at the local level.

The study findings allow understanding the way women representatives are perceived and provide insights of how women operate and function at the local level. These findings will allow the government and other programmes can find ways to increase their effectiveness and strength. It also gives a better understanding of women’s political apprenticeship which will allow programmes such as SHARIQUE to better design leadership development programmes for the women representatives. Women’s real life experiences give an understanding of how they negotiate with bureaucracy and use it to further themselves and their causes. The advocacy issues address political parties as well as government.

Output: The final report of the study has already been submitted but not yet published, a research brief will be prepared.

Research Team: Maheen Sultan, Sohela Nazneen, Sahida Khondaker, Bayazid Hasan, Ahmed Asif Enam, Towhid Iqram Mahmood

For further information, please contact: Sahida Khondaker

 

4. Pattern of time use of adult women and men in rural North Bangladesh ( 2013- 2014)

Funded By: Action Aid Bangladesh

The Strengthening Women Collective (SWC) is a multi country project with overall objective to support marginalised women’s social and economic empowerment and right to decent work in Bangladesh. The project will facilitate to increase women’s equal access to and control over their incomes will make an important contribution to women’s social and economic empowerment within their households, communities and decision-making structures at local and national government level. By empowering  women to recognise the extent of their unpaid care work and paid work and supporting actions to increase women’s incomes through collectives, the action will enable women to have an improved standard of living and dignity through better economic livelihoods, increased status, and ability to negotiate relationships. Economic independence, improved health and general well-being will be enhanced. 

The project had implemented in Fulsori upazila under Gaibandha district and Sadar upazila under Lalmonirhat district. CGST/BIGD and AAB have begun collaboration on this project in 2013. A tool was designed and tested for the collection of time-dairies.  A sample was drawn up and training provided to the NGO field staff collecting the data. A computerized data entry format was developed and training on this was provided as well. A report on the data up to February 2014 has been prepared.
Research on women’s unpaid care work is needed to help understand the different perceptions of women and men on division of labour and gender norms around women’s role in the economy outside the home. Time diaries are a participatory tool that will be used with women and men keeping a record of their use of their time to gain an understanding of how gender roles play out. The evidence generated will play an important role in subsequent gender awareness work and the design of advocacy tools for AAB. Compiling and analysing time use diaries will provide a platform for grassroots women in the collectives with which AAB works, to negotiate unequal gender divisions of labour in the household and lobby for support of such from policy makers, as it makes their unpaid care work visible for themselves as well as for other members of the family.

Objective of the research was to identify use of time by women and men in different works including UCW to understand how gender roles play out. So the research will collect, process and analyse time-use data from women’s collectives in two districts and will prepare an analytical report.

Output: Research Report, A Photo Exhibition

Research Team: Simeen Mahmud, Maheen Sultan, Sohela Nzneen, Sadia Mustafa
For further information, please contact: Sadia Mustafa.

 

6. South Asia Regional Secretariat for Women Parliamentarians

Program Leads: Maheen Sultan and Dr. Sohela Nazneen,

Funded by PRODIP, The Asia Foundation

The South Asian Regional Secretariat of Women Parliamentarians (SARSWP) was established in July 2012 to serve as a regional coordination centre for the Network of South Asian Women parliamentarians for two years. In 2013, SARSWAP hosted the first annual conference of the network in Colombo. The conference served as a learning exchange for women MPs on caucus creation, women in conflict and legal reforms related to violence against women. CGST also hosted national level consultation workshops and roundtables on gender budgeting and women’s leadership in Bangladesh and Sri Lanka under this program.  It has also published six technical papers and six briefs on women’s political participation and regional collaboration during its existence.

  • Publications:

1. Akter, Marufa ( February 2013). Women in Politics in South Asia. SARSWP Technical Brief, issue 1. Center for Gender and Social Transformation (CGST).

2.  Afroze, Rahnuma (February 2013). Women Parliamentary Caucus. SARSWP Technical Brief, issue 2. Center for Gender and Social Transformation (CGST).

3.  Afroze, Rahnuma (February 2013). Regional Mechanism for Women's Political Participation in South Asia: Problem and Perspective. SARSWP Technical Brief, issue 3. Center for Gender and Social Transformation (CGST).

4.  Akter, Marufa (February 2013). UN Security Council Resolution 1325 and its Implication. SARSWP Technical Brief, issue 4. Center for Gender and Social Transformation (CGST).

5.  Akter, Marufa ( September 2013). Situational Analysis of Women’s Representation in Political Parties in Bangladesh, SARSWP Technical Brief, issue 5. CGST

6. CGST (2014),  Women in Parliament and National Politics in Bangladesh: Roundtable Report, BIGD

7. CGST (2013),  First Meeting of the South Asian Network of Women Parliamentarians, BDI

8. CGST (2013), Consultation Report of the Meeting on Women’s Leadership, Sri Lanka,  BDI 

  • Workshops and Conferences
  1. CSO consultation on Gender Budgeting, Dhaka, November 2012
  2. First Meeting of the South Asian Network of Women Parliamentarians, Colombo, February 2013
  3. Consultation Report of the Meeting on Women’s Leadership, Sri Lanka, Colombo, February, 2013
  4. Women in Parliament and National Politics in Bangladesh: Roundtable Report, Dhaka, March 2014
  • Contact: Maheen Sultan,  Deputy Co-ordinator, CGST, and Lead Researcher, BIGD

Links: http://www.bracu.ac.bd/secretariat/; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z9ma3yKc-G8

7. Assessing the Performance of the Gender Quality Action Learning (GQAL) Program in Changing  Gender Norms and Behaviors

Project leads:  Simeen Mahmud and Maheen Sultan
Funded by Gender Justice and Diversity, BRAC
 
The research assessed the level of gender equality within households and in the wider community in GQAL program areas, and compared it with a similar non-GQAL area. Further, the project assessed the extent to which the wider community mobilized to take action against gender inequality.
  • Publication:
1.Mahmud, S, Sultan, M and Huq, L. (2012). Assessing the Performance of GQAL in Changing Gender Norms and Behavior, BDI Research Report # 1.
  • Workshop:
Seminar on Assessing the Performance of Gender Quality Action Learning (GQAL) in Changing Gender Norms and Behavior, Dhaka, Sept 2012
  • Contact: Simeen Mahmud, Co-ordinator, CGST, and Lead Researcher, BIGD; Lopita Huq, Research Fellow, BIGD

 

8.Empowerment and Participation: Linking Local Realities to Global Action (Unpaid Care Work Strand)

Program Lead: Dr. Sohela Nazneen
Funded by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA), co-ordinated by the Instiute of Development Studies (IDS), UK.

Unpaid care work includes, cooking, cleaning, childcare, and taking care of the elderly, and many other activities that sustain society and are conducted out of a sense of obligation and love but are not counted as a part of the GDP. Through this three year long project, the Institute of Development Studies (IDS), SMERU (Indonesia) and the Center for Gender and Social Transformation (CGST), BIGD are collaborating on: a) developing policy ‘asks’ for addressing unpaid care needs;  b) generating knowledge on unpaid care work; and c) building partnerships to promote these policy demands. In 2012, CGST held an inception workshop in Bangladesh. In 2013, CGST produced a review of existing research and policy on unpaid care in Bangladesh and held a national dissemination workshop. This year, CGST has completed a photo exhibition titled ‘Bhinno Rupe Purush’ or Images of Caring Men, which showcased over 90 photographs  by 21 professional and amateur photographers. The exhibition is the first of its kind in Bangladesh and aimed to generate discussion around redistributing the burden of unpaid acre work and men’s role and participation in performing these activities.

•    Publications:
1    Huq, Lopita (2013) Unpaid Care Work Literature Review, BDI Research Report # 4. http://interactions.eldis.org/unpaid-care-work/country-profiles/bangladesh;
2    CGST (2013), Unpaid Care Work: Situating it in Research and Policy Context in Bangladesh, National Workshop Report, CGST: BDI http://interactions.eldis.org/unpaid-care-work/country-profiles/bangladesh;
3    Huq, Lopita (forthcoming), Unpaid Care work in Bangladesh: Policies, Practices, Evidence, Working paper no Institute of Development Studies, UK

•    Workshops:
1.    Unpaid care work: What is it and why are we so interested in it? Inception Workshop,  June 2012
2.    National Workshop on Unpaid Care Work: Situating it in Research and Policy Context in Bangladesh, September 2013 http://interactions.eldis.org/unpaid-care-work/country-profiles/bangladesh/workshops;

Contact: Dr. Sohela Nazneen, Lead Researcher, BIGD

External links: http://interactions.eldis.org/unpaid-care-work;

http://interactions.eldis.org/unpaid-care-work/country-profiles/bangladesh; http://interactions.eldis.org/unpaid-care-work/country-profiles/bangladesh/workshops;

9. Follow-up to Dhaka Declaration: Women’s Access to Justice

Project Lead:  Maheen Sultan,

Funded by the UN Women, Dhaka Office


Follow up to the Dhaka Resolution was a UN Women funded research on the impact on access to justice among the beneficiaries of Promotion of Legal and Social Empowerment of Women intervention (PLSEW, Phase II) undertaken by German Technical Cooperation (GTZ) between 2008-2011. This research assessed the impact of the PLSEW to contribute to strengthening local governance and government services to respond effectively to reduce violence against women. A dissemination workshop on the findings of the study was organized on 8 December 2013 at Bangladesh Shishu Academy. A review of laws on violence against women has been completed and a position paper prepared for the Ministry of Women and Children Affairs (MOWCA). Furthermore, a video documentary was commissioned by CGST and shared within the participants of the workshop.

  • Contact: Maheen Sultan, Deputy Co-ordinator, CGST, and Lead Researcher, BIGD
  • Publications: Add report; review; audio visual name

10. Masculinity and Gender Equality Study South Asia: Masculinity, Economic Opportunity and Migration in Bangladesh

Project Lead: Maheen Sultan,

Funded by the World Bank, Dhaka Office.

 

The proposed study on “Masculinity, Gender and Development in South Asia”  is part of a wider series of initiatives by the World Bank to expand research on male gender roles, in order to gain a more nuanced understanding of gender relations and how they impact constructions of both ‘masculinity’ and ‘femininity’ in diverse cultural and socio-economic contexts. CGST has completed ____ life histories in ____ areas, and submitted the research report

  • Publication: Add Report name
  • Contact: Maheen Sultan, Deputy Co-ordinator, CGST, and Lead Researcher, BIGD
  • External link: Add World Bank Link

 

11. Paving the Path to lmproved Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health in Bangladesh

Project Lead: Simeen Mahmud,

Funded by International Center for Research on Women (ICRW).

This research aimed to identify the supply and demand-side determinants of access, provision and utilization of health services of 15-19 year old adolescent girls in slum communities of urban Dhaka. It used secondary data sources, primary qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis it will explore the gendered social norms that influence fertility and family formation, and how these norms affect married and unmarried 15-19 year old adolescent girls’ demand for sexual and reproductive health services.

  • Publication: ICRW report link[L1] 
  • Contact: Simeen Mahmud, Co-ordinator, CGST; and Lead Researcher, BIGD;

                Lopita Huq, Research Fellow, BIGD

External Link:  Suzanne Petroni, PhD, Senior Director, Gender, Population and Development, ICRW. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


 [L1]There is no report from BIGD. BIGD only have the final draft that ICRW wrote and submitted to World Bank and checked both their websites but there is no publication.

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Empowerment and Participation: Linking Local Realities to Global Action

(Unpaid Care Work Strand)

Program Lead: Dr. Sohela Nazneen
Funded by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA), co-ordinated by the Instiute of Development Studies (IDS), UK.

Unpaid care work includes, cooking, cleaning, childcare, and taking care of the elderly, and many other activities that sustain society and are conducted out of a sense of obligation and love but are not counted as a part of the GDP. Through this three year long project, the Institute of Development Studies (IDS), SMERU (Indonesia) and the Center for Gender and Social Transformation (CGST), BIGD are collaborating on: a) developing policy ‘asks’ for addressing unpaid care needs;  b) generating knowledge on unpaid care work; and c) building partnerships to promote these policy demands. In 2012, CGST held an inception workshop in Bangladesh. In 2013, CGST produced a review of existing research and policy on unpaid care in Bangladesh and held a national dissemination workshop. This year, CGST has completed a photo exhibition titled ‘Bhinno Rupe Purush’ or Images of Caring Men, which showcased over 90 photographs  by 21 professional and amateur photographers. The exhibition is the first of its kind in Bangladesh and aimed to generate discussion around redistributing the burden of unpaid acre work and men’s role and participation in performing these activities.

•    Publications:


1    Huq, Lopita (2013) Unpaid Care Work Literature Review, BDI Research Report # 4. http://interactions.eldis.org/unpaid-care-work/country-profiles/bangladesh;
2    CGST (2013), Unpaid Care Work: Situating it in Research and Policy Context in Bangladesh, National Workshop Report, CGST: BDI http://interactions.eldis.org/unpaid-care-work/country-profiles/bangladesh;
3    Huq, Lopita (forthcoming), Unpaid Care work in Bangladesh: Policies, Practices, Evidence, Working paper no Institute of Development Studies, UK

•    Workshops:


1.    Unpaid care work: What is it and why are we so interested in it? Inception Workshop,  June 2012
2.    National Workshop on Unpaid Care Work: Situating it in Research and Policy Context in Bangladesh, September 2013 http://interactions.eldis.org/unpaid-care-work/country-profiles/bangladesh/workshops;


Contact: Dr. Sohela Nazneen, Lead Researcher, BIGD

External links: http://interactions.eldis.org/unpaid-care-work;

http://interactions.eldis.org/unpaid-care-work/country-profiles/bangladesh; http://interactions.eldis.org/unpaid-care-work/country-profiles/bangladesh/workshops;

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Project leads:  Simeen Mahmud in collaboration with Naila Kabeer, SOAS, London

Funded by International Development Research Center (IDRC), India

 

The 18-month research explored why there has been a greater reduction in gender disadvantage in sex ratios, in Bangladesh, compared to India and Pakistan, in spite of higher levels of poverty. This results show that there is dramatic shift in the attitude towards having daughter in Bangladesh and the current socioeconomic changes that created greater opportunities for girls have a influential role behind this change. Culture is also a strong explanatory factor behind the divergence in attitude when Bangladesh and India is compared.

  • Publication:

 

  1. Huq, L., N. Kabeer and S. Mahmud (2013). “Diverging Stories of Missing Women in South Asia: Is Son Preference Weakening in Bangladesh”, Feminist Economist, Vol.

 

  1. Huq, H., Kabeer, N and Mahmud, S. (2013) Diverging Stories of Son Preference in South Asia: A Comparison of India and Bangladesh, BDI Working Paper # 7.

 

  • Contact: Simeen Mahmud, Co-ordinator, CGST, and Lead Researcher, BIGD; Lopita Huq, Research Fellow, BIGD
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Assessing the Performance of the Gender Quality Action Learning (GQAL) Program in Changing Gender Norms and Behaviors

Posted in Completed Projects and Programs

Project leads:  Simeen Mahmud and Maheen Sultan
Funded by Gender Justice and Diversity, BRAC
The research assessed the level of gender equality within households and in the wider community in GQAL program areas, and compared it with a similar non-GQAL area. Further, the project assessed the extent to which the wider community mobilized to take action against gender inequality.
  • Publication:
1.Mahmud, S, Sultan, M and Huq, L. (2012). Assessing the Performance of GQAL in Changing Gender Norms and Behavior, BDI Research Report # 1.
  • Workshop:
Seminar on Assessing the Performance of Gender Quality Action Learning (GQAL) in Changing Gender Norms and Behavior, Dhaka, Sept 2012
  • Contact: Simeen Mahmud, Co-ordinator, CGST, and Lead Researcher, BIGD; Lopita Huq, Research Fellow, BIGD
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